Used betta fish multicolor as therapy for reducing addictive social media use in the covid-19 outbreak

Nilma Zola(1), Rima Pratiwi Fadli(2), Yola Eka Putri(3), Dominikus David Biondi Situmorang(4), Ifdil Ifdil(5),
(1) Department of Guidance and Counseling, Faculty of Education, Universitas Negeri Padang  Indonesia
(2) Indonesian Institute for Counseling, Education, and Therapy, West Sumatera  Indonesia
(3) Indonesian Institute for Counseling, Education, and Therapy, West Sumatera  Indonesia
(4) Department of Guidance and Counseling Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia Jakarta  Indonesia
(5) Department of Guidance and Counseling, Faculty of Education, Universitas Negeri Padang  Indonesia

Corresponding Author
Copyright (c) 2023 Nilma Zola, Rima Pratiwi Fadli, Yola Eka Putri, Dominikusdavid.biondi76@gmail.com David Biondi Situmorang, Ifdil Ifdil

DOI : https://doi.org/10.24036/02021104122235-0-00

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Abstract


During the COVID-19 pandemic, people used social media to communicate and entertain themselves. Yet, excessive social media use can cause anxiety and sadness. Hence, fresh social media addiction therapies are crucial. We suggest treating social media addiction with colorful Betta fish. This fish's brilliant colors and interesting behavior reduce stress and anxiety and promote well-being. Betta fish are low-maintenance pets that may be kept in a small tank at home or at work. Interacting with animals helps improve mental health. So, the "betta fish" treatment may be a low-cost and accessible way to improve mental health and minimize social media addiction amid the COVID-19 pandemic. This intervention's efficacy and best practices need further stud.


References


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Copyright (c) 2023 Nilma Zola, Rima Pratiwi Fadli, Yola Eka Putri, Dominikusdavid.biondi76@gmail.com David Biondi Situmorang, Ifdil Ifdil

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